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CLEAR CLONE CONCEPT DENTURE (3C)

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Enter the Clear Clone Denture TechniqueThis will be a 2-3 part series on the use of clear duplicate dentures for treating edentulous patients.
Background
Denture patients come in many shapes and sizes.  The patients are as varied as fish in the sea.  Some are old, some young and many in between.  Some have large ridges that help with denture stability, some, not so much.  There are times when the patient’s existing dentures can be a valuable reference for use in fabrication of new appliances.  This may be as simple as recreating an identical esthetic composition to making major changes to satisfy proper clinical parameters.  As dentistry continues to include implant solutions for patients, we often need a way to start these cases utilizing the information contained within the patient’s old dentures.  Don’t reinvent the wheel if it already exists!
As with most restorative cases, getting into the articulator with accurately mounted models is our initial goal.  It is pointless to continue l…

Speaking of Santa...

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I hope everyone is recovering from the Holiday bustle!
We're back at it here at Drake!

I had a realization on Christmas Eve as I was sneaking around, playing Santa, and trying not to wake up my two little boys:I AM SUCH A FRAUD.

What do I do once this jig is up? What am I going to tell them about the Tooth Fairy? And the Easter Bunny? 

I'm eating the cookies, writing the Elf's good-bye letter, drinking the milk, sneaking the presents from my closet...
Don't get me wrong, now. It's SO much fun, and so worth it...but seriously, WHO STARTED ALL THIS MESS that we have to clean up? Is there an article on how to gently let these folks go from their lives?

Below is a link to a neat article I found when trying to find someone to blame for having to keep cash in my purse for the next few years!  (I recently had to sneak a dollar from the 4 year old's piggy bank when the 8 year old unexpectedly lost a tooth.)  I found a lot of fun facts from different regions - even thegoing r…

WHO KNEW - by Grethe Whitman

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Who Knew?

FULL DENTURE & DURACETAL PARTIAL SETUP (WAX) - By Drake Lab

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IS THANKSGIVING GOOD FOR YOUR TEETH?

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....it's good for our taste buds, at least.
Here's a fun little read we came across from the ADA in the spirit of Thanksgiving! It tells us all about our favorite T-Day foods, and the good and bad that come with them.  http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/thanksgiving-slideshow


R E L I N E S

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“I sent a reline to the lab and the bite is now open half an inch in the anterior, what happened?”
By  Larry R. Holt, DDS, FICD
Things can easily be messed up during a reline process.  But, if you take a little extra time and follow a protocol, you can easily get nice results too.
First, is the denture worth relining?  Really old dentures are typically worn and the acrylic is not amenable to accepting new acrylic.  
Its ok to tell a patient that their denture is ready for the scrap heap!
First (a second time) its very difficult to make major corrections on tooth position by performing a reline.  It happens accidentally on occasion, but when attempting to do something like intentional lengthening for more tooth reveal, its very difficult to be predictable.  This is a procedure to refit the intaglio surface, not to realign the teeth.
Remember, all relines are closed bite impressions.  If you take the reline impression open mouth, it is almost impossible to maintain proper occlusion.  Eve…

OBTU, SAY WHAT?

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OBTU, SAY WHAT?

Before working in the dental lab, I had never given much thought to a palatal obturator.  Before working with Dr. Amit Paryag, I had never seen a restorative dentist with such fire and keenness toward patient and product perfection - "patient centered care", as he refers to it.  When the two rolled in to one for us at Drake, something momentous was born. 



DID YOU KNOW? In 1560 Lusitanus was probably the first to describe what is today known as palatal obturator used for permanent luetic fistula of the palate (). In 1564 Ambroise Parè called his small obturators “couvercles”, and in 1575 changed the name to “obturateur" which is derived from the Latin “obturo” meaning to stop upIn 1634, Johson translated Parè’s “surgery”, published for king Henri the third. The text described an appliance to restore the palatal defect caused by venereal diseases and gunshot wounds. In order to create his obturators, Parè filled the cavities with a gold or silver plate a lit…